Other Ceremonies

Blessing of the Hands (Traditional) 
  • Bride, please turn and face groom and hold his hands palms up, where you can see the gift that they are to you. 
  • These are the hands, young and strong and vibrant with love, that hold yours on your wedding day, as he promises to love you all the days of his life. 
  • These are the hands you will place with expectant joy against your stomach, until he too, feels his child stir within your womb. 
  • These are the hands that look so large and clumsy, yet will be so gentle as he holds your baby for the first time. 
  • These are the hands that will work long hours to earn money for you and your family. 
  • These are the hands that will be nicked and bruised from fixing things around the house to make you more comfortable. 
  • These are the hands that will caress your body through the years, to make the passion of love come alive in you. 
  • These are the hands that will countless times wipe tears from your eyes; tears of sorrow and tears of joy. 
  • These are the hands that will comfort you in illness, and hold you when fear or grief rack your mind. 
  • These are the hands that will tenderly lift your chin and brush your check as they raise your face to look into his eyes; eyes that are filled completely with his overwhelming love and desire for you. 
  • Groom, please face Bride and hold her palms up, so you may see the gift they are to you. 
  • These are the hands hold yours on your wedding day as she gives you her pledge to love you, and accepts your ring. 
  • These are the hands that are smooth and young and carefree now, but will be lined and rougher, working to make you comfortable. 
  • These are the hands that will hold each child in tender love, soothing them through illness, teaching them right from wrong and wringing themselves in worry when trouble comes. 
  •  These are the hands that will hold your face and wipe tears from your eyes - in wonder and awe that you would cry for her. 
  •  These are the hands that will hold you in joy, excitement and hope each time she tells you that you are to have another child; that together you have created a new life. 
  •  Perhaps these are the hands that will comfort you when you are told you cannot have a child, and will convince you that together you will create a new life in other ways. 
  •  These are the hands that through the years will caress your body in the passion of love, to enhance your intimacy. 
(Read by Officiant) These are the hands that will enter the Sacrament of Matrimony. These four hands will be your armor and shield against the evils and temptations of the world.
 These are the hands that will reach out, first to each other, then united, will spread your love and your sacrament to all they touch.
 These are the hands that will ease your parents' loneliness as you leave the nest, will first teach your own children the marvels of married life, and will be a sign to friends and strangers alike as to just how wonderful married life can be.
 Through these four hands, God will renew His Church. These hands are the hope of a troubled humanity. These are the hands that will change the world.
Blessing of the Hands (Contemporary) 
  •  Bride, please turn and face Groom and hold his hands palms up, where you can see the gift that they are to you. 
  •  These are the hands of your best friend, your lover and partner. 
  •  These are the hands, young and strong and vibrant with love, that hold yours on your wedding day, as he promises to love you all the days of his life. 
  •  These are the hands that will passionately love, cherish and protect you, 
  •  These are the hands that will work alongside yours as you build your life together. 
  •  These are the hands that will countless times wipe tears from your eyes; tears of sorrow and tears of joy. 
  •  These are the hands that will comfort you in illness, and hold you when you are sad or afraid. 
  •  These are the hands that will tenderly lift your chin and brush your cheek as they raise your face to look into his eyes; eyes that are filled completely with his overwhelming love and desire for you. 
  •  Officiant or Family Member: Groom, please face Bride and hold her hands palms up, so you may see the gift they are to you. 
  •  These are the hands of your best friend, your lover and partner. 
  •  These are the hands that hold yours on your wedding day as she gives you her pledge to love you unconditionally, and accepts your ring. 
  •  These are the hands that will be a source of strength to you when you are in need. 
  •  These are the hands that will work alongside yours as you build your life together. 
  •  These are the hands that will passionately love, cherish and care for you. 
  •  These are the hands that will comfort you in illness, and hold you when fear or grief racks your mind. 
  •  These are the hands that will hold your face and wipe tears from your eyes - in wonder and awe that you would cry for her.  
 Bride and groom, please clasp your four hands together. 
 Officiant: May these four hands grow old together, intertwined just as your lives will be, forever united in love, patience and strength. 
 These four hands will be your armor and shield against the hardships of the world. May they always be ready to reach out, first to each other, then together to spread love to all they touch. 
 May these hands continue to build your relationship, both when it is easy and when it is hard to do so. May they have strength to hold on when you are afraid. May they be tender and gentle as you nurture each other. May these hands build an extraordinary marriage full of love, happiness and peace. 
More Options 
These are the hands of your best friend, full of love for you, holding yours on your wedding day
These are the hands that will scratch your back when you have an itch you can’t reach
These are the hands that will help decorate your Christmas tree
These are the hands that will dial your number just to say hello – when you’ve been missed throughout the day
These are the hands that, at times, will want to strangle you
These are the hands that will passionately love and cherish you through the years
These are the hands that will hold you for comfort and tickle you for joy
These are the hands that will wipe the tears from your eyes
These are the hands that even when wrinkled and aged will still be reaching for yours, still giving you the same unspoken tenderness with just a touch


 Unity Candle

Lighting the Unity Candle symbolizes the joining together or blending of separate lives. It is the coming together of two families and the merging of two individuals into one married couple, a love that burns jointly.

The Unity Candle is an arrangement of three candles (the center candle sometimes being larger than the other two). The two side candles are lit either before the wedding ceremony begins or just before the Unity Candle ceremony. These are usually, but not always, lit by the Bride's parents and the Groom's parents on their respective sides of the altar. Lighting the Unity Candle normally takes place after the Bride and Groom exchange vows and rings. The Officiant will share a few thoughts about the unity that exists between a husband and wife when they enter into marriage, after which the couple will take their respective candles and light the center candle. The couple then extinguishes their respective candles by gently blowing out the flame, symbolizing that they are now "one." Sometimes the couple chooses not to blowout their candles to symbolize that, even though they are now one, they continue to retain their individuality. (See words used in Lighting of the Unity Candle in Traditional, Contemporary, Civil, short and Sweet, Second Time Around, All in the Family, Interfaith and Vow Renewal ceremonies.)

  The Marriage Vessel and the Rose®
The Marriage Vessel and the Rose® ceremony may be used as an alternative to the Unity Candle, especially for outdoor weddings. You will need a table for the vessel and the rose. Filling the vessel with water is only necessary if you use the second version. The Officiant begins by explaining the significance of the ceremony.

(The Officiant says):
(Groom) _______and (Bride) _______have chosen to share two gifts, The Marriage Vessel and the Rose to symbolize their ever-growing life-long commitment to each other. The spiritual roots of The Marriage Vessel and the Rose® grow out of an understanding of God as the Potter, or Creator of life (holding up the vessel, and God as the Gardener, or Sustainer of life (holding up the rose). The vessel of clay, lovingly shaped by the Potter, is a symbol of love's strength and endurance. The miracle of the vessel is that it not only protects, but is enriched by that which it holds, the rose. Likewise, the rose, born of the tiniest of seeds, symbolizes the beauty and potential of growing in love throughout life together. Both the vessel and the rose are individually unique, yet when combined, they create an object of even greater beauty.

  (Following are two popular versions of The Marriage Vessel and the Rose®.)

The Marriage Vessel and the Rose®
 
First Version
(The Groom presents the rose to the Bride and says):
(Bride) ________" this rose represents the beauty I see in you. / I thank you for the person you are / and the person I am becoming / because of your love for me.
(The Bride presents the vessel to the Groom and says):
(Groom), this vessel represents the strength I see in you. / I thank you for the love and care you have given me, / and for all we will share together in this life.
(The Bride then places the rose in the vessel; they hold it together and the Bride and Groom say):
As our gifts bring beauty and purpose to each other, / may our lives continue to enrich and strengthen one another.
(The Officiant says):
(Groom) ________ and (Bride) ________, as you share each passing day, and as your days become years, remember this tradition you have created. On each wedding anniversary, place one additional rose in the marriage vessel to symbolize your ever-growing love for one another. May The Marriage Vessel and the Rose® always be a symbol of the beauty and strength you bring to each other's lives.

Second Version
(The Groom hands his Bride a long-stemmed rose and says):
(Bride) ________, take this rose as a symbol of my love. / It began as a tiny bud and blossomed, / just as my love has grown for you.
(The Bride places the rose into a vessel or vase filled with water and says):
(Groom) _________" I take this rose, / a symbol of your love, / and I place it into water, / a symbol of life. / For just as this rose cannot survive without water, / I cannot live without you.
(The Groom responds by saying):
In remembrance of this day, / I will give you a rose each year on our anniversary / as a reaffirmation of my love / and the vows we have spoken here today.
(The Bride responds by saying):
And I will refill this vessel with water each year, / ready to receive your gift / in reaffirmation of the new life you have given me / and the vows we have spoken here today.
(The Bride and Groom join hands around the rose-filled vessel and say together):
Just as this rose and vessel of water give beauty and life to each other, / so may our love blossom and grow / throughout our life together.

Family Medallion® (For ceremonies involving children)
This ceremony, created by Rev. Roger Coleman of Clergy Services, Inc., was designed to significantly include the children of those being married in the wedding celebration. The Family Medallion® provides a symbol for recognizing family relationships by adding a third circle to the two "marriage circles." During this part of the ceremony, the children shall come forward and form a circle with the Bride and Groom who welcome the children into the family and verbally make a commitment to them.
(The Officiant says);
Just as (Groom) _______and (Bride) _______ gave each other rings as symbols of their love and commitment to one another, they also would like to present [each of] you with a gift as a symbol of their love and commitment to you. The Family Medallion® is made up of three intertwining circles, two of which symbolize the union of this man and woman in marriage. The third circle represents the joining of children to this union, making it complete as we celebrate the new family created here today.
(The Bride and Groom present the children with the Family Medallion®, and give each child a hug and a kiss.)
You may obtain Family Medallion ® jewelry, at www.lovenotesweddings.com. See the All in the Family Ceremony on pages 31-36 for a more expanded presentation of the Family Medallion®.

Handfasting (Celtic Tradition)
The Officiant explains the significance / the handfasting ritual by saying.) Have you ever wondered where the words "tying the knot" come from? The expression "tying the knot" refers to the traditional early Celtic marriage ritual of Handfasting. Handfasting, the ancient word for wedding, was traditionally recognized as a binding contract of marriage between a man and a woman before weddings became a legal function of the government or a papal responsibility of the church. After the wedding vows and ring exchange, the couple's hands were bound together with a cord that was tied in a "love knot," signifying the joining of their lives in a sacred union. Today, handfasting is a symbolic ceremony to honor a couple's desire for commitment to each other, and to acknowledge that their lives and their destinies are now bound together.

(The Officiant holds up the cord and addresses the couple with these words); please hold each other's hands, palms up (her hands resting in his), so you may see the blessing they are to you. (Groom) ________ and (Bride) _______, this cord is a symbol of the life you have chosen to live together. Up until this moment you have been separate in thought, word, and deed. But as this cord is tied together, so shall your lives become intertwined. With this cord, I bind you to the vows that you have made to one another. With this knot, I tie you heart to heart, together as one.
 
(The Officiant wraps the cord loosely around the Bride's and Groom's wrists to tie a "love knot" and says); The knot of this binding is not bound by the cord, but rather, by your own vows of love. For, as always, you hold in your own hands the making or breaking of this union. May this "love knot" always be a reminder of the binding together of two hands, two hearts, and two souls into one. And so are you bound, each to the other, for all the days of your lives. (Cord may then be removed and placed on the altar. Many couples choose to keep the "love knot" as a memento of their new union created that day.)

Ceremony of The Rose (The First Gift)
First Version
 The Ceremony of the Rose symbolizes the merging of the Bride's and Groom's families. When the Bride enters, she has in her possession two roses, usually red. As she approaches the altar, the Bride will stop and offer a rose and a kiss to her mother or significant mother figure. In doing this, she is expressing her gratitude for preparing her for this moment and for receiving the man she is about to marry into her family. When the wedding ceremony has ended and she and the Groom exit, the Bride will stop and offer a rose and a kiss to the Groom's mother or significant mother figure. In doing this, she is expressing her gratitude for preparing her new husband for this moment and for receiving her into the Groom's family. A variation you may consider is to present both roses either upon the entrance or upon the exit.

Second Version
(The Officiant says):
(Groom) _______ and (Bride) _______ have chosen to give each other a rose which is their first gift as husband and wife. (At this time, the Officiant will give both the Bride and the Groom a rose, and they, in turn, will present their rose to each other.) This rose was born of the tiniest of seeds and has blossomed into the beautiful flower that it is today. And so it is with your relationship. It began as a small feeling that grew and eventually blossomed into something beautiful. And now you stand before us today to make a commitment to each other as husband and wife. Since you know that love must be shared, it is your desire to share these first gifts with two very special people, two people who helped to prepare you for this moment and molded you into the individuals that you are today. (The Bride and Groom turn and present their roses to their mothers or significant mother figures and offer a hug or a kiss.)

Third Version
(The Officiant says):
Today you will receive the most honorable titles that exist between a man and a woman-the titles of husband and wife. You have chosen to give each other a rose as your first gift. In the language of flowers, the rose was considered a symbol of love, and a single rose meant only one thing-"I love you." So it is appropriate that your first gift to each other as husband and wife will be a single rose. please exchange your gifts. (The Bride and Groom present each other with a rose.) (Groom) ________ and (Bride) ________, because you both have given and received this symbol of love, I would encourage you to choose one very special place in your home for roses. Then on each anniversary, you both may take a rose to that special place as a recommitment to your marriage, and express with this symbol that your marriage is a marriage based on love.

In every marriage, there are times when it is difficult to verbalize certain feelings. Sometimes, we hurt those whom we love most, then find it difficult to say, "I am sorry," or "please forgive me," or "I need you." When you simply cannot find these words, leave a rose at your specially chosen place, and let that rose say what matters most-"I still love you." The other should accept this rose for the words that cannot be found, and remember that the unspoken love is the hope you share and the faith you have in your future together as husband and wife.

 
Unity Cup
Two separate goblets are filled with wine. Before the couple is pronounced husband and wife, the Officiant pours one-half of the wine from each goblet into a separate cup, the Unity Cup, from which each sips.
(The Officiant says):
This glass of wine is known as the Unity Cup, or Kiddush Cup, and is symbolic of the Cup of Life. As you share this cup of wine, you share all that the future may bring. The half-filled goblets are a reminder of your individuality;
the single cup mark your new life together. As you share the wine from a single cup, so may you, under God's guidance, share contentment, peace, and fulfillment from your own Cup of Life. May you find life's joys heightened, its bitterness sweetened, and each of its moments hallowed by true companionship and love.

The Officiant holds up the Unity Cup and may then say this prayer): Blessed are Thou, 0 Lord our God, Creator of the fruit of the vine.
 (The Groom takes a sip of wine first, then offers the cup to the Bride.)
 
Breaking of the Glass (Jewish Tradition)
The Breaking of the Glass is a Jewish tradition with many meanings. It is a symbol of the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem, a representation of the fragility of relationships, and a reminder that marriage changes the lives of individuals forever.
After the couple is pronounced husband and wife, the glass, or light bulb, which usually is wrapped in a cloth and placed in a sill< bag, is then laid by the groom's foot.

(The Officiant says):
We conclude this ceremony with the Breaking of the Glass. In Jewish tradition, the Breaking of the Glass at a wedding is a symbolic prayer and hope that your love for one another will remain until the pieces of the glass come together again, or in other words, that your love will last forever. The fragile nature of the glass also suggests the frailty of human relationships. Even the strongest of relationships is subject to disintegration.

The glass then, is broken to "protect" the marriage with this implied prayer: May your bond of love be as difficult to break as it would be to put together again the pieces of this glass.

The groom then breaks the glass with his foot and everyone shouts "Mazel Tov!" which means" good luck and congratulations!"
 
Bible, Coins, and Lasso
The Bible, Coins, and Lasso are Hispanic traditions most often associated with Mexican weddings, although Spain and other Latin-American countries use variations of these, as well. They are symbolic of the spiritual, physical, and emotional elements in a marriage. The Bible symbolizes the religious guidance and wise counsel for life's decisions-spiritual element. The thirteen coins represent the financial support and blessings for their home-physical element. The lasso signifies the union of their lives and hearts as one common destiny-emotional element.

After the Bride and Groom exchange their vows and rings, Sponsors, or Parents, bring forth a white Bible and a Rosary and place it in the hands of the Bride and Groom. (While they are holding it, the Officiant will bless the Bible with these words): Lord, bless this Bible and the lives of those who read it. We know that the Holy Bible is the word of God. We pray that it will be the spiritual guide that will light your pathway and will guide you in all your decisions, so that your will and God's will are one and the same. Amen. (The Sponsors then take the Bible and Rosary and sit down.)

Coins-Physical The Coin Sponsors bring forth the box of coins and empty it into the Groom's hands. (The Officiant, explaining their significance, says): These thirteen coins are a symbol of the care that the Bride and Groom will give in order for their home to have everything it needs. These coins also are a sign of the blessings of God and all the good things they will share together. (The Officiant then blesses the coins with these words): Lord, may these coins be a symbol of mutual help throughout their lives. Provide them with all they need for their home. We give You thanks for all the good things they are going to share because of Your many blessings. Amen.

 The Groom drops the coins into the Bride's hands and says the following vows: (Bride) _______, receive these thirteen coins as a symbol of my dedication in caring for our home and providing for our family's necessities.

 The Bride responds by saying: (Groom) _______" I accept your gift of dedication, and I promise on my part that everything provided will be used with care for the benefit of our home and family. (The Sponsors then take the coins and sit down.)

Lasso Emotional Lastly, the Lasso Sponsors bring forth the lasso and place it in a figure eight around the shoulders of the kneeling Bride and Groom. (The Officiant then blesses their union with these words): (Groom) _______ and (Bride) _______, this lasso symbolizes the union of two hearts into one heart, two souls into one soul, and two lives into one life. 0 Lord, bless this couple as they journey through life together.. .hand in hand, heart to heart, flesh to flesh, and soul to soul. Amen. (The Sponsors then remove the lasso and sit down.)

 
Jumping the Broom (African-American Tradition)
Jumping the Broom is a tradition that symbolizes sweeping away the old and welcoming the new, a symbol of a new beginning.

The ceremony begins with the guests forming a circle around the Bride and Groom who are standing in front of the broom on the floor. The couple picks up the broom and begins to sweep around in a circle while the Officiant explains the symbolism.

(The Officiant says:) Jumping the Broom may have its roots in an African tribal marriage ritual where sticks were placed on the ground, representing the couple's new home. However, it became popular among African American slaves who could not legally marry, so they created their own rituals to honor their unions. The Bride and Groom are sweeping together in a circle to signify the sweeping away of their former single lives, their past problems, and their previous cares. The broom represents a threshold between past and present, and "jumping the broom" symbolizes the crossing of this threshold into a new relationship as husband and wife. Starling a new life with another person requires a leap of faith, and by taking this leap, the couple shows their dedication to work together through all of life's circumstances.

The Bride and Groom then place the broom on the floor again and join hands. Everyone counts, "One, two, three.. .Jump!" After they jump, the Officiant may conclude the ceremony with this version of a traditional slave poem:

Dark and stormy may come the weather, This man and woman are joined together.
Let none but Him that makes the thunder, Put this man and woman asunder.
I therefore announce you both the same, Be good, go long, and keep up your name.
The broomsticks jumped, the world's not wide, She's now your own, go kiss your bride!

 This custom may take place during the ceremony after the couple is pronounced husband and wife, or at the reception just after the bridal party enters the reception area.
Many couples choose to decorate their broom with ribbons, flowers, or other mementos to make it unique as a special keepsake for their home.

 Blessing Stones (Wishing Stones)
The ritual of the Blessing Stones, or Wishing Stones, as they sometimes are called, is a wonderful way to include everyone in the wedding by way of offering blessings and good wishes to the newlyweds. It also is a good way to ensure that everyone will make contact with the Bride and Groom at some point during the day. This ritual may be performed at the actual ceremony itself (before the blessing), or at the conclusion of the service (in a receiving line manner), or later at the reception.

When the guests arrive at the ceremony, they are given a Blessing Stone along with a note card with words printed on it such as: "My wish for you is..." or "May you be blessed with..." or "May God bless you with..."

During the ceremony, the Officiant explains the significance of the Blessing Stones. me Officiant says): Today is a very blessed occasion in the lives of (Groom) _______ and (Bride) _______. You have been invited here today because of your special relationship with them. When you arrived, you received a stone along with a note card. These are called "Blessing Stones." Since we all desire nothing but the best that life has to offer this couple, I ask each of you to complete the sentence on the card and sign your name, so your best wishes and your blessings for (Groom) _______ and (Bride) _______ always may be a reminder of your love for them on this day of celebration.

 At some point (either during or after the service), the guests will share their blessing or wish with the newlyweds and toss the Blessing Stone into a Blessing Bowl, a Wishing Well, a Fountain, or whatever is chosen to hold the water. They then may place their "love note" into a basket or box for the couple to reflect on at a later time.
Many couples keep their Blessing Stones in a special place in their home (a vase of flowers, around a candle, in an aquarium, etc.) to remind them of all the love, good wishes, and blessings they share because of their family and friends.

A variation of this ritual would be at an outdoor wedding near a body of water (lake, pond, ocean, etc.). Stones either are gathered at the site or provided for the guests. After the ceremony, everyone follows the Bride and Groom's recessional to the water, makes a wish or blessing for them and casts their stone into the water.
The Officiant says:} The ripples that are made in the water represent the love and good wishes not only for this couple, but for all the world. For as our ripples cross and recross one another's, so our love and good wishes touch and retouch all those around us and all those with whom we come into contact throughout our lives.
this also may be said at the indoor ceremony.)

 You can be as creative as you want with this ritual. Here are some ideas:
· Stones-you may use decorative stones, rose quartz stones, which symbolize love, or other pebbles from a special place.
· Container for water-you will need a Blessing Bowl (any decorative basin, bowl, or bucket will work), or a table top fountain, or a Wishing Well (as large and elaborate or as small and simple as you wish).
· Love Notes-buy decorative, ready-made note cards from a stationery or craft store and print your opening blessing phrase on them, or, for an even more personal touch, design and print your own note cards at home on your computer. Remember to begin your blessing phrase with: "My wish for you is..." or "May you be blessed with..." or "May God bless you with..."

 
Blending of the Sands (Hawaiian Tradition)
The Blending of the Sands is a beautiful and meaningful unifying ceremony from Hawaii that symbolizes the joining of the Bride and Groom or the blending together of their families. There are two versions offered-one for the couple and one for the family.
Glass containers are needed for the Bride, Groom, and each child represented (when children are included).

Each container is filled with a different colored sand, representing each individual's uniqueness. (Optional: the Officiant also may hold a vase filled with sand. He may begin the sand ceremony by pouring a layer of neutral colored sand into the Unity Sand Bottle, which symbolizes the foundation of the marriage.) After the Officiant reads the sand ceremony text, the Bride and Groom (and each child)pour their individual containers of sand into the Unity Sand Bottle simultaneously. They may wish to leave a small amount of sand in each container to symbolize that, although they now are joined as one, they still retain their own individuality.
 

Version I-The Couple (The Officiant says): (Groom) _______ and (Bride) , today you are making a commitment to share the rest of your lives with each other. Your relationship is symbolized through the pouring together of these two individual containers of sand. (Groom) ________, through the sands of time you have grown into the person you are today. This container of sand represents all that you were, all that you are, and all that you will ever be. (Bride) _______., through the sands of time you have grown into the person you are today. This container of sand represents all that you were, all that you are, and all that you will ever be.

As you each hold your separate container of sand, it symbolizes your lives prior to this moment; individual and unique. Now as you blend the sands together, it symbolizes the blending together of your two hands, two hearts, and two lives into one. (The Bride and Groom combine their sands into the Unity Sand Bottle.) Just as these grains of sand can never be separated again, so may your lives be blended together for all eternity.

Version 2-The Family (The Officiant says): (Groom) ______, (Bride) ______, and (Children) _____ _______, today you are making a commitment to share the rest of your lives with each other. Your new family relationship is symbolized through the pouring together of these individual containers of sand.

One represents you, (Groom) , and all that you are as husband and father,. One represents you, (Bride) _______., and all that you are as wife and mother. The other container(s) represent(s) (Children) ____________ who make(s) this family complete. As you each hold your separate container of sand, it symbolizes your lives before today. Now as you blend the sands together, it symbolizes the blending together of your hands, your hearts, and your lives into one family. (The Groom, Bride, and children combine their sands into the Unity Sand Bottle.) Just as these grains of sand can never be separated again, so may your lives be blended together for all eternity.

Creative ideas:
· The Unity Sand Bottle, as well as the individual containers, may be a vase, vial, glass, jar, heart-shaped bottle, or any other glass container.
· Choose a color of sand that reflects your unique personality.
· Melt some wax to seal the Unity Sand Bottle, which also will hold the sand in place, and then seal it with a cork or a lid.
 . Have your names and wedding date etched into the glass of the Unity Sand Bottle for a special wedding ~ keepsake and a reminder of your union.

 
The Unity Cross


A New and Unique idea for your Wedding Ceremony. The Unity Cross is a multi-piece sculpture assembled and Locked together in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, during the unity service, Creating a lasting memory of your Wedding Day.   

The Unity Cross is a multi-piece sculpture that is assembled during the Unity Service of your Wedding Ceremony representing how the -Two become One.
The Groom places the outer Cross in the beautiful wood base as the Pastor explains how God created man- Bold, Strong, the Defender of the Family yet how he is empty and incomplete without the woman.
The Bride then places the more delicate cross inside of the Grooms cross as the Pastor explains how God created Woman- Delicate, multi-faceted, taking care of all of the little things that completes the man, and the -Two become One. The Bride and Groom then use the 3 golden pegs to lock the union(cross) together in the name of the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit as the pastor exclaims that: What God has brought together let no man take apart.
Then the Unity Cross is taken home and displayed as a Daily Reminder of your Wedding Day and the Covenant that you both have made. The Unity Cross is the newest and most unique idea for your wedding ceremony that will truly last a lifetime. 
 

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